Disability Information SDS employees holding documents to be converted

Student Disability Services converts course materials into alternate formats for students


Room Selection and Set-up

Accessibility Map

Use the new accessibility checklist (PDF) to plan your event.

Choosing a physically accessible location

Schedule your event in wheelchair accessible buildings and rooms. Conduct an on-site visit to evaluate the facility. Wheelchair access must be available in all portions of the venue that participants will be using, including the speaker's area. An accessible restroom should be within 200 feet of the event location. Braille and tactile signage should be available for directional assistance.

Accessibility begins with parking—how people on and off campus are able to navigate to your event. Given the topography of our campus, many people with disabilities navigate campus with accessible parking and drop off areas. Survey the location for accessible parking and an accessible path of travel from the parking area. If the event is held in a location with no close available parking, identify a method of transportation that will assist attendees with getting to the event location. When planning an event with 50 or more guests, it is recommended that you contact Commuter and Parking Services (C&PS) at 255-4600, for assistance with addressing the parking needs of your guests. C&PS can also assist you with identifying parking options for participants with disabilities.

If you must host your meeting in an inaccessible location or one in which access is not easily achievable, communicate the access plan for participants with disabilities in your pre-event publicity. Be sure to include a contact number for questions about access to the venue.

Accessible Room Set-Up

Once an accessible site is selected, the meeting room furniture must be arranged so that people who use mobility devices (e.g., wheelchairs, scooters, walkers, crutches, canes) can maneuver throughout and use the amenities independently; people who are blind or have low vision can navigate easily and safely; people who are deaf or hard of hearing can use assistive listening systems and see speakers, interpreters, and captioning; and all participants feel comfortable and ready to be engaged in the event.